ECPI Graduate Co-Authors Book on VMware vSphere

It’s been just eight short years since ECPI University graduate Harley Stagner received his BA in Management Information Systems, but he is already making a name for himself. A Richmond-Moorefield Campus graduate, he has just co-authored a book titled Managing and Optimizing VMware vSphere Deployments. In it, he and co-author Sean Crookston offer start-to-finish lessons for vSphere planning, implementation, operation, management, and troubleshooting.

Content includes:
•    Building a strong foundation for virtual infrastructure
•    Smoothly integrating vSphere 5 into current environments and considerations
•    Establishing a more stable infrastructure
•    Choosing hardware and making optimal configuration decisions
•    Transforming VMware design from blueprint to completion
•    Operating vSphere solutions more efficiently on a day-to-day basis
•    Automating tasks and maximizing availability
•    Streamlining the installation of updates, patches, and upgrades
•    Forecasting and planning capacity on an ongoing basis to support growth
•    Overcoming roadblocks on the journey to 100% virtualization
•    Monitoring vSphere 5 with tools provided by VMware and its community
•    Discovering the most valuable and current online VMware resources
•    Examples using Cisco Unified Computing System (UCS)

Harley is the only VMware Certified Design Expert (VCDX) in Central Virginia, and the 46th in the world. He is currently a DC Solutions Engineer with TBL Networks in Glen Allen,Virginia.

ECPI Student Helps Build Mobile App for Teachers

ECPI University student Brad Nicholson was among a select group of students invited to participate in Dominion Enterprises’ most recent Hackathon, an intense two-day app development competition that assembles teams of software programmers, graphic designers, product developers and students to channel their creative energies into mobile applications aimed at learning.

With support from the U.S. Department of Education (DOE) and The Learning Registry, the event produced an array of new applications designed for schools and teachers, all of which have been made publicly available to foster ongoing development within the open-source community, DOE, and school systems nationwide. Among the 10 groups of competitors, Brad’s team – The Leftovers – created an app that National Geographic is expecting to put into immediate use as data collection and retrieval tool.

Charleston Students Create Covert Device, Demonstrate Need for Physical Security in Networked Computing

Most people are familiar with anti-virus software, but what about a threat lurking right under the desk?  Well, a group of ECPI University students in Charleston, South Carolina have demonstrated just how simple it is to create an information-stealing covert device that seems like something from a spy novel.

The students embedded a popular miniature computer called a Raspberry Pi into a typical multi-plug power strip to create a device that, once implanted into an office setting, collects data covertly for recovery by the creators.  The project required collaboration between Electronics Engineering Technology students, who completed much of the necessary hardware assembly, and Computer Information Science students, who programmed the device to carry out its task.

“Covert devices are very real and prevalent in our technological world,” said Project Manager Wesley Boothe.  “These devices can be built with common materials from the internet and deployed in an inconspicuous manner with the purpose of gaining access to internal organizational data.” Appropriately enough, they named the device “The Odysseus,” a nod to the famous myth of the Trojan horse.
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