Business. Economics. Volunteerism. Working with kids through Junior Achievement

ECPI University has been supporting Junior Achievement of Greater Hampton Roads for a number of years. Greg Casey, ECPI’s Chief Financial Officer, serves on the board of directors, and this past March 27, volunteers including faculty and staff taught economics to children at Bayside Elementary School’s second, third, fourth and fifth grades. Together ECPI volunteers reached almost 300 students.

Junior Achievement of Greater Hampton Roads was established in the area in 1966. Business professionals, parents, retirees and college students enter schools to teach Junior Achievement programs. Volunteers use their personal experiences to make the curricula practical and realistic, and provide children with positive adult role models, who illustrate ways to build self-confidence, develop skills and find avenues of success in our free enterprise system.

Junior Achievement provides the materials for the lessons that are generally under an hour with volunteers completing in four to five lessons. Carrie Griffith, Criminal Justice instructor at ECPI, volunteered to be a teacher and had a great experience.  She commented, “The kids are fun and enjoy having someone new teach them. The first week we were talking about zones and when we were discussing the industrial zone, every word out of their mouth had to do with pollution and how the industrial area is where all the pollution comes from. It’s funny to see how different students are now than when I was in school.”

“Not only does ECPI serve as mentors to Bayside Elementary School students, but its fundraising efforts allow us to provide students with educational programs that share valuable lessons about the world of work, the importance of saving money, and the relationship between learning and earning,” said Lauren Franza, Education Director and Operations Manager for Junior Achievement of Greater Hampton Roads. “ECPI’s fundraising efforts will be used to support both in-school and after-school programs that teach children how to be successful in the ’real world.’”

In March, two teams representing Admissions and Financial Aid squared off in competition in the annual bowl-a-thon to raise funds for the non-profit. Students representing Business Cents, the business club, and MCI also worked to raise funds. In total over $2,000 was raised to benefit Junior Achievement.